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Making Holy

February 20, 2015

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Each day is a ceremony~if only we could remember. But in the barrage of stimulus and inputs and tasks—in the multiplicity of the dreams we live within, we forget, at times, that this, all of this, is holy. One of our essential tasks as human beings, is, and has always been, the enactment of remembrance. This is how we make holy what is beautifully offered. This enactment becomes a response to the call of the world~ a way that we confirm, affirm and grow our relationship with the web of Life. A sunrise takes our breath away. A ponderosa, rich with butterscotch scent, speaks to us in the dusk, and we leave an offering at her roots. Tobacco, cornmeal, a prayer, a whispered blessing, a song, a stone. This, an exchange. An act that makes holy. A holy making of relationship.

In the healthiest of ecosystems—there is an intricate dance of giving and receiving. And yet, our human species has slipped into a collective amnesia~ a kind of soporific sense of entitlement that keeps us from seeing what is given to us in every moment. And ironically, from within this state of entitlement, we often experience a never-ending state of lack or relentless boredom~ a kind of hunger that springs from the sense that there is never enough (stuff, stimulus, relationship, acknowlegement, money,love, etc.). And, in this state, we can forget that reciprocity is part of our response-ability—that is, our ability to respond—and that it is this resonse that brings us alive and makes us whole.

This way of making holy is deep within our bones—it is a natural impulse within us that has been forgotten. And it arises simply from the recognition of the extraordinary aliveness, magic, vibrancy and wholeness of the naked moment—whether it be the slant of light through the window, a red tail hawk that flies directly overhead, a lover who shows up on our doorstep, a child who calls out in the night, a buck who leaps on the path before us, or a dying beloved who already speaks to and from the other side of the Veil. We can acknowledge this contact that is being made with us, that we are making contact and are received.

Ritual can be a kind of empty act~obligatory, rote, hollow. It is, after all, our presence, our full presence (and the presence of the more than human other) that makes any ritual come alive. And when we engage ritual as a creative act, when we bring our whole selves to this moment, when we acknowledge communion and say to the world, I see you, or I know I am seen by you—a strand in the web of life is re-membered (re-woven). And in that moment, that strand glistens in the sun of this awareness and quivers, just as we quiver when we are truly witnessed. And then, the whole web of Life trembles and wakes up to this noticing.

What would it be for each of us, every day, to make offerings, authentically, originally, creatively—to that which reveals itself to us? In my experience, when we enact this remembrance, one revelation leads to another. One synchronicity dances with another. One door opens another door and soon we are down a hallway and into a world we have never seen—all because we have shifted our attention, let go of our old ways of seeing. And now we are walking through poetry. And now the world is singing to us in rhymes. And now our waking dreams and sleeping dreams are speaking to each other. And it becomes clear that not only is this magic generously given, but that we are this magic itself.

~©Laura Weaver

LauraWeaver.org

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One Comment leave one →
  1. February 21, 2015 4:34 pm

    So lovely, and so very true. May I remember to make this moment and this day holy. May my work with others be holy. May my work with you be holy. Thank you, my love!

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